Academic Medicine in the News

Friday, July 13, 2018

Researchers find genetic makeup affects prostate cancer treatment prognosis

A new Cleveland Clinic study showed that a variant in the HSD3B1 gene causes men with the anomaly to metabolize a common prostate cancer drug differently than men without the genetic anomaly, leading to poorer outcomes. Researchers hope the findings lead to a tailored approach to treating prostate cancer patients based on their genetic makeup.

Friday, July 13, 2018

Girls introduced to careers in science, technology

The University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences hosted a workshop to get girls interested in STEM fields and allow them to meet women in science-related careers. The girls were shown how to use gait- and motion-detection technology to monitor each other’s movements, something orthopaedic physicians use in their practice.    

Tuesday, July 03, 2018

Undergraduate Students Perform Cancer Research at Summer Program

The George Washington University School of Medicine and Health Sciences launched GW-SPARC, a summer program designed to expose undergraduates to careers in cancer research. The program allows them to perform hands-on, mentored research and teaches them how health disparities can affect cancer patients.

Thursday, June 28, 2018

Researchers Discover Potential New Treatment for Brain Cancer

Researchers at Albany Medical College identified a potential new way to stop the spread of one of the deadliest forms of brain cancer, glioblastoma. This aggressive brain tumor affects 14,000 new patients every year, and treatment options are currently limited due to the tumor’s rapid growth.

Thursday, June 28, 2018

Health Care Preceptors Qualify for New State Tax Credit

A new law in Hawaii allows those in the medical, pharmacy, and nursing professions to receive a tax credit for their volunteer work with students at University of Hawaii at Manoa John A. Burns School of Medicine. Volunteer physicians play a vital role in medical education by allowing students to learn firsthand from their experiences while working alongside each other.

Thursday, June 21, 2018

High School Students Learn About Health Care Field

The University of Toledo College of Medicine and Life Sciences hosted thirty-nine high school freshmen from underserved areas at the CampMed summer program. Students learned how to use medical instruments, make a cast, and suture in addition to other hands-on lessons throughout the two-day program.

Tuesday, June 19, 2018

Students Organize Health Fair for Shelter Residents

Students from Columbia University Vagelos College of Physicians and Surgeons led a health and wellness fair at the Fort Washington Men’s Shelter in New York City. They set up health and wellness stations within the shelter, and provided basic medical exams and information on topics like diabetes, nutrition, sexual health, yoga, and naloxone for opioid overdose reversal. 

Tuesday, June 19, 2018

Resident Wellness Course Expanded

The University of Arizona’s Center for Integrative Medicine has expanded a course designed to minimize stress and burnout, and improve overall resident well-being to include more than 1600 residents nationwide. The 4.5-hour course lays a foundation for well-being concepts and introduces them to resiliency activities that they can utilize throughout their residency and careers.  

Friday, July 13, 2018

‘PulsePoint’ app launches thanks to medical students

Students at the Eastern Virginia Medical School worked with local fire and rescue responders to teach CPR to the community to improve the effectiveness of new app ‘PulsePoint’. The app alerts people trained in hands-only CPR to nearby cardiac emergencies so the patient can get help as quickly as possible. 

Tuesday, July 03, 2018

Scientists Discover How Antiviral Gene Works

Researchers at the Albert Einstein College of Medicine identified how the antiviral gene RSAD2 is able to prevent a number of viruses from replicating. The scientists hope to test the effect of the gene and the compound it generates on a broader range of viruses.

Tuesday, July 03, 2018

Georgia's First Mobile Stroke Unit is Now in Service

The Emory University School of Medicine and Grady Health System unveiled the first mobile stroke ambulance in Georgia. The unit has an onboard CT scanner that links patients with physicians to allow lifesaving treatment to begin during the critical time before the patient arrives at the hospital.

Thursday, June 28, 2018

New App Teaches Users How to Stop Life-Threatening Bleeding

The Uniformed Services University’s National Center for Disaster Medicine and Public Health recently launched Stop the Bleed, a free smartphone app designed to teach users how to halt life-threatening bleeding in an emergency — and save lives in the critical minutes before first responders arrive.

Thursday, June 21, 2018

Patients Receive Free Cataract Surgery During Cataract-A-Thon

Fifty patients with cataracts received free corrective surgery at the second annual Cataract-A-Thon, a collaboration between University of Tennessee Health Science Center and community partners. The event benefits patients without the financial means to obtain the sight-saving procedure.

Thursday, June 21, 2018

Discovery Offers Path to Better Diagnosis of Endometriosis

Researchers from the University of South Carolina School of Medicine found that patients with endometriosis have an increased number of Myeloid-derived suppressor cells in their blood. It’s estimated that 10% to 20% of American women are affected by the disease, which can cause severe pain, irregular bleeding, and infertility.

Tuesday, June 19, 2018

A New Approach to a Challenge in Emergency Medicine

Emergency medicine physicians must rely on the patient to tell them which medications they are taking, and this represents a challenge as the patient could be unconscious or unsure, and the presence of certain drugs could dramatically affect the way a patient reacts to treatment. Researchers at Virginia Commonwealth University have determined a new approach using mass spectrometry and hope it could eventually reduce trauma-related complications.  

Wednesday, June 06, 2018

New Syringe Exchange Program Opens in Tennessee

The East Tennessee State University Center of Excellence for Inflammation, Infectious Disease, and Immunity at the Quillen College of Medicine now provides new, unused needles to intravenous drug users as part of a statewide program to help prevent the spread of HIV/AIDS and viral hepatitis.