Academic Medicine in the News

Thursday, December 14, 2017

Merging Medicine and Engineering

Texas A&M University Health Science Center has launched Engineering Health (EnHealth), the nation’s first comprehensive educational program to fully integrate engineering into all health-related disciplines. EnHealth is a multi-college initiative designed to produce health care professionals with an engineering mindset who can invent transformational technology to address  health care’s greatest challenges.

Thursday, December 14, 2017

Electrical Bandages Help Prevent Infections

Researchers at The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center have shown—for the first time—that special bandages using weak electric fields to disrupt bacterial biofilm infection can prevent infections, combat antibiotic resistance, and promote healing in infected burn wounds. The dressing becomes electrically active upon contact with bodily fluids.

Wednesday, December 06, 2017

Wilderness Medicine Exercise Immerses Residents in Realistic Scenarios

Penn State Health Milton S. Hershey Medical Center recently staged a wilderness medicine exercise to prepare residents to handle a range of illness and injury scenarios. The exercise involved residents from the departments of emergency medicine and family and community medicine, as well as the Division of Sports Medicine.

Thursday, November 30, 2017

Tiny Microscope Captures Mice Brain Activity

Researchers from the University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus and the University of Colorado Boulder have developed a tiny microscope they can mount on the heads of mice. The device allows scientists to view and control neural activity in real time and to image cells in different layers of the brain for a more complete picture of neuron interactions.

Thursday, November 30, 2017

Catching Lung Cancer Early

The University of Cincinnati Cancer Institute’s Lung Cancer Program is partnering with Margaret Mary Health, a community hospital in Batesville, Indiana, to help identify lung cancer in its earliest stages and to provide specialized treatment when needed to residents of the Tristate region—Ohio, Kentucky, and Indiana.

Thursday, November 16, 2017

Deafness Doesn’t Stop Medical School Graduate From Pursuing Career in Surgery

When asked to list three things that uniquely define her, Grace Lassiter, a recent graduate of the Texas A&M College of Medicine, doesn’t hesitate in her response:  “I love to paint, I want to be a surgeon, and I am deaf.”

Thursday, December 14, 2017

Cancer Patients Now Can See a 3D Preview of Radiation Treatment

Oregon Health & Science University (OHSU) has been using 3-D images and simulations to teach students about administering radiation therapy for a year. Now OHSU will use Virtual Environment Radiotherapy Training—or VERT™—to help patients and their families understand radiation therapy and to alleviate their concerns about upcoming procedures.

Wednesday, December 06, 2017

Rolling iPads Help Hospitalized Patients Communicate

At Upstate Medical University, patients can receive interpreting services through an “interpreter on wheels.” When in-person interpreters are not available to help patients communicate, an iPad attached to a rolling stand lets staff contact interpreters of 240 languages. It’s also used for American Sign Language, the second-most requested language at Upstate.

Wednesday, December 06, 2017

ALS Symposium Features Updates on Research and Treatment

More than 100 investigators, physicians, nurses and patients gathered recently to learn about new research and interventions related to amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) at the 7th Annual Les Turner Symposium on ALS and NeuroRepair. The event was held at Northwestern Medicine Prentice Women’s Hospital in Chicago.

Thursday, November 30, 2017

Amazing Race for Health Advocacy

Every other year, residents at the University of Alberta Faculty of Medicine and Dentistry participate in the school’s Amazing Race for Health Advocacy, a competition based on the reality TV show but focused on teaching them about the social determinants of health. Recently, a team was tasked with taking the bus to and from a local food bank and transporting the food back with old suitcases and a stroller. Another team was instructed to buy everything on a lengthy grocery list—including expensive vitamin D drops for children—with just $20.

Thursday, November 16, 2017

Faster Stroke Treatment in New York

New York-Presbyterian’s Mobile Stroke Treatment Unit, an ambulance outfitted specifically to treat stroke patients, is part of a broader telehealth initiative at NewYork-Presbyterian that is designed to make the hospital’s world-class care faster and more accessible.

Thursday, November 16, 2017

From the Operating Theater to the Stage

The Bard Hall Players, a student-run theater group at Columbia University’s College of Physicians and Surgeons, provides future health professionals the opportunity to reduce stress and build emotional intelligence. The school also has other artistic offerings, including an a cappella group called the Ultrasounds.