Academic Medicine in the News

Thursday, August 17, 2017

Patient Receives 3-D Printed Skull After Traumatic Brain Injury

Gaurav Gupta, MD, assistant professor of neurosurgery at Rutgers Robert Wood Johnson Medical Center, performed emergency surgery to relieve brain swelling on Chris Cahill, 35, of New Brunswick, N.J., removing part of Cahill's skull. While the plan was to replace the skull once the swelling subsided, it was infected and thus unusable. Gupta decided the best solution to replace the missing skull bone was to use 3-D printing.

Thursday, August 17, 2017

Chicago Area Gets First New Emergency Medicine Residency Program in 20 Years

Rush University Medical Center has launched a new emergency medicine residency program with 12 physicians in the first class. When fully staffed, the program will have 36 trainees who will learn all aspects of emergency medicine with a particular focus on disaster preparedness and the use of analytics to measure efficiency and outcomes.

Friday, August 11, 2017

Researchers Engineer Next Generation Trans-Catheter Heart Valves

Faculty from The Ohio State University (OSU) College of Medicine, along with graduate students from the OSU College of Engineering, are developing a next generation trans-catheter heart valve. The valve would provide a more durable treatment for patients with heart valve disease.
 

Thursday, August 03, 2017

SEAL-tested, NASA-approved

Former Navy SEAL Jonny Kim, MD, a 2016 Harvard Medical School graduate and an emergency medicine resident at Massachusetts General Hospital, is making plans to leave residency and begin astronaut training.

Thursday, July 27, 2017

Addressing the Urgent Need to Train Doctors to Care For Older Americans

As the baby boomer population continues to increase, there is an evolving need for doctors who are trained in the needs of seniors. In an effort to address this growing concern, the University of Massachusetts Medical School’s Chief Resident Immersion Training program is designed to improve chief residents’ understanding of geriatric care challenges, and enhance their leadership and teaching skills through small group discussions, mini-lectures, and mentoring sessions.

Thursday, July 27, 2017

Doctors Discover Genetic Marker for Resilience

Doctors at the Emory Brain Health Center may have found a genetic marker for resilience and well-being. In a study of more than 25,000 people in the Grady Trauma Project, 12% to 15% of participants with this genetic marker reported higher levels of psychological and spiritual well-being and greater purpose in life, despite personal difficulties. 

Wednesday, July 19, 2017

WVU School of Medicine Names University’s First Patient Care Music Therapist

Amy Rodgers Smith, MMT, assistant professor in the West Virginia University (WVU) School of Medicine’s Department of Physical Therapy, was recently named the university’s first health care-focused music therapist. She will implement music therapy services at J.W. Ruby Memorial Hospital and at WVU Medicine Children’s and provide clinical supervision to students in the WVU Music Therapy program.

Thursday, August 17, 2017

Understanding the Aging Brain

University of Florida Health researchers are looking to slow or avert age-related cognitive decline. Their efforts include National Institute of Aging-funded research into transcranial direct current stimulation and cognitive training, as well as basic-science investigations into the effect of lifestyle interventions on brain network functions in animal models.

Friday, August 11, 2017

The Last Word: ‘Hola, Soy la Doctora Bell’

Christine Bell, MD, a third-year pediatric resident at Emory University School of Medicine, discusses how her ability to speak Spanish affects her interactions with patients at the continuity clinic, a part of Grady Health System in Atlanta that primarily serves children of Hispanic immigrants, and at the nearby children's hospital.

Friday, August 11, 2017

New Genetic Counseling Degree Program Offered

The Baylor College of Medicine Board of Trustees, Academic Council and Faculty Senate have approved a new Genetic Counseling Program, which will award a Master of Science degree through the School of Allied Health Sciences. The two-year program prepares graduates to engage individuals and families who are at risk for, or affected by, conditions that may have a genetic cause.

Thursday, August 03, 2017

Creating New Borders for Clinical Rotations Abroad

A two-way, reciprocal partnership between the dermatology residency program at the University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine and the Instituto de Dermatologia y Cirguia de Piel (INDERMA) in Guatemala gives residents at both institutions the opportunity to experience a clinical rotation abroad. Since the program began in 2013, seven Penn residents have gone to Guatemala, while 14 INDERMA residents have come to Philadelphia.

Thursday, July 27, 2017

Recovery Center to Combat Opioid Addiction Opens in Rhode Island

Lifespan, Rhode Island’s largest hospital system, has opened an outpatient treatment facility for those dealing with opioid addiction and substance abuse called the Lifespan Recovery Center in Providence. The Recovery Center, which has the capacity to treat up to 650 patients, seeks to tie together all aspects of treatment for the patient.

Wednesday, July 19, 2017

Med Students Pedaling for Public Health, Coast to Coast

Two students from the University of Connecticut School of Medicine will continue the summertime cross-country bicycle tour that is now a 12-year school tradition. Sonali Rodrigues and Brett Lehner make up the 2017 Coast to Coast for a Cause team. This year’s cause is “An Apple a Day.” The money they raise will pay for planting fruit trees high school campuses and other public places to provide access to healthy food and health education.

Wednesday, July 19, 2017

Clinic for Local Farmworkers Wins National Award For Interprofessional Education

Since the summer of 2016, students and faculty from University of Central Florida’s medical, nursing, physical therapy, and social work schools have worked with the University of Florida College of Pharmacy to provide free care to farmworkers and their families. At each of the four clinics held so far, the team has treated between 40 and 80 patients ranging in age from 2 months to older than 70. The collaboration recently received an inaugural national award from the U.S. Public Health Service and Interprofessional Education Collaborative.